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Why You're Not Getting the Promotion and Pay You Deserve?

Are you suffering from impostor syndrome? It's a feeling of inadequacy when in doubt. It has nothing to do with (the lack of) self confidence, not even an obsession with Miles Morales (or Carol Danvers). It's rooted to one's upbringing, which might prompt some to suspect of mistreatment. It's far from that, as it's rather labeling (by parents) or probable role playing during childhood. It's possible for a teenager to be a perfectionist before becoming aware of it. Some are rather oblivious to the reaction (or impression) of other people until it's truly affecting them. Social media should play a major role here, but the office culture is another thing.

If an employee is disappointed at not getting a promotion, if not pay raise, then it may be more than impostor syndrome. The same employee has been working for the company for a number of years, if not more, and has shown zest and interest in the job that colleagues didn't fail to notice. The boss would know it, yet employees see it differently. What might have gone wrong?

<h2>5 Questions for the Employee in Doubt</h2>

Are you a smart professional? Try to assess yourself for several minutes or more. You may be the brightest graduate from your college, with lots of references from your professors and any figure of authority (in your department), but you don't have the street smarts. This is not an uncommon case, yet you must not expect to be told (or reminded) by other people. It might be a painful expression if that is the case, which can turn out to be a good thing. It should help you figure out what you have learned during your tenure in the company, and what (career) goal(s) you have set for yourself. You won't expect too much if you're sensible, and you would steer clear of office politics. It can be traced to other factors.

Is there something (or someone) missing in your life? You're becoming a perfectionist, and there are moments when your colleagues didn't notice it. You remind yourself that you won't get upset about it, but don't count on (the extent of) your patience. Your workmates may have noticed it, and one or two might be envious of your effort. Your boss may be aware of it, but there's timing in promotion and pay raise. The new year is about to start soon, and there would be a performance appraisal. You should do it, on your own, which helps you in creating a shortlist that highlights your year. You can bring it up when you discuss your performance with your boss. If this is not the case, then it may be a lack of outlet. Look for a hobby (if it's really the case). If it's more than that, then ask yourself if you're ready to get off the market.

Do you know the office culture well enough? There are several reasons on why you're not getting the recognition that you deserve. If the company doesn't have any issues, then it may be the management. If there are tens of employees, then it won't be hard to make a guess. Make a mental note.

Does your boss think highly of you? There's a huge difference in doing the tasks that your boss is asking you to do, and showing your competency (by doing the tasks that you're asked to do). It won't be good enough to keep on impressing your superior, as the time would come when you want more than recognition. There's a right time to bring it up. (How about next month?)

How about your colleagues? It won't take a month to find out what your workmates think of you. Don't ever attempt to treat them, if not show your generous side, when you have a hidden agenda. It's little things that count the most, and in this case, your kind acts and keen understanding of teamwork should help you go a long way.

<h2>How to Deal with an Extreme Case</h2>

An extreme case is that point when you’re thinking of submitting your letter of resignation. It can also be your threatening of resigning from the company, and it does happen when you believe that you’re too good. Let’s assume that you’re wise not to do it. Yet.

If you strongly believe that you can be better off somewhere, then study your options carefully. You like to climb up the career ladder quickly, but you might make a huge misstep if you resign shortly. It may be sensible to suck it up while you’re looking at the ads. Bid your time on this one, as you must make sure that you find a company that is better than the one you’re working for. And submit your letter of resignation after you get a job offer (and agree to the salary and compensation that are stated in your contract). If that is not the case, then you may need a holiday. You’ve earned it (if your feeling of inadequacy is an indication).

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